People to Follow on Twitter

11 Sep

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Anderson, editor-in-chief, Wired 

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Handle: @chr1sa

If you are a fan of Wired, you’ve got to follow Anderson. The guy is brimming with intel about the hottest gadgets and weirdest science research.

 

Vaughan Bell, neuropsychologist, Universidad de Antioquia

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Handle: @vaughanbell

Bell’s Twitter feed is an extension of his fascinating blog, mindhacks. He shares a smattering of articles on the latest trends in psychology, such as suicide as a global issue and changes made to the DSM.

 

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, professor, cognitive neuroscience at UCL

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Handle: @sjblakemore

Blakemore studies the brain, and she’s fascinated with how we respond to social situations. She’s one of the leading researchers on the teenage brain in the UK.

 

Alex Bogusky, co-founder, Crispin Porter + Bogusky

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Handle: @bogusky

Bogusky is one of the biggest players in the advertising industry, and he’s got lots of ideas he likes to share with people — especially about environmentalism, and what people are doing to innovate in the space.

Rachel Botsman, social innovator, author

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Handle: @rachelbotsman

TIME called Botsman’s forte, research on collaborative consumption, “one of the 10 ideas that will change the world.” She offers the human side to an esoteric concept.

 

Chris Brogan, president, Human Business Works

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Handle: @chrisbrogan

The marketing consultant and speaker tweets a ton, but amidst all the personal chatter there’s plenty of good stuff about marketing in the digital age.

 

Deepak Chopra, physician and author

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Handle: @DeepakChopra

People have been turning to Chopra for years. Now the guru tweets his thoughts on how to respond to life’s tough questions. And his tweets aren’t too heavy; they’ll simply put your day into perspective.

 

Roger Dooley, author, “Brainfluence”

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Handle: @rogerdooley

If you want to know about neuroscience and what it has to do with marketing, Dooley is sure to have the scoop.

 

Arianna Huffington, editor-in-chief, The Huffington Post

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Handle: @Ariannahuff

Sure, Huffington’s job is to share news, but she’ll engage you with huge global issues and intriguing facts about sleep and power. As one of the most powerful women in media, she also likes to share her tips for success — and you ought to listen.

 

Tara Hunt, CEO, Buyosphere

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Handle: @missrogue

E-commerce, entrepreneurship and women in tech are Hunt’s territory. Plus, she’s really interactive.

 

Charlene Li, founder, Altimeter Group

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Handle: @charleneli

Li, the author of “Groundswell: Winning In a World Transformed By Social Technologies,” shares her strategies on leading in a world run by social. Li tweets range from praising businesses on their customer-centric approach to personal anecdotes from Paris.

 

Annie Murphy Paul, author, “The Cult of Personality”

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Handle: @anniemurphypaul

Paul’s strategies on “how we learn and how we can do it better” appear in her Twitter feed, and she may just tweet at you asking if you have a question about learning.

 

Daniel Pink, author, “Changing The Way We Work”

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Handle: @danielpink

The Wall Street Journal and New York Times bestselling author wants to change the way we think about our jobs and careers. One of the “50 most influential business thinkers in the world,” Pink will have you mulling over his own message, and will provide some cultural recommendations along the way.

 

Maria Popova, editor, brainpickings.org

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Handle: @brainpicker

Popova is a self-described “interestingness hunter-gatherer and curious mind at large,” and she loves sharing random, interesting facts about creativity.

 

Erik Qualman, author, “Socialnomics”

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Handle: @equalman

Qualman, the creator of Socialnomics, wants to predict how social will look a decade from now.

 

Brian Solis, principal, Altimeter Group

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Handle: @BrianSolis

He’s a go-to guy for thought-provoking ideas in new media marketing and the consumer revolution.

 

Justin Wolfers, economist, University of Pennsylvania

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Handle: @JustinWolfers 

Wolfers interprets real-world events using economic research in ways regular people can (mostly) understand.

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